Designing the Nation’s Capital: the 1901 Plan for Washington, DC

Dear Coalition Friends:

Recent symposia, lectures, and books are focusing much needed attention on past and future planning for the city of Washington and the National Mall at its heart. Scott Berg’s Grand Avenues. The Story of the French Visionary Who Designed Washington, DC is a fascinating historical study. The Framing a Capital City symposium at the National Building Museum last April included talks on a number of topics, including my Reconnecting the National Mall to the Capital City in the 21st Century, which we have now posted on our website. See details below.

The latest, Designing the Nation’s Capital: The 1901 Plan for Washington, DC, published by the Commission of Fine Arts, is the subject of a talk next week at the National Building Museum:

September 10
Designing the Nation’s Capital: the 1901 Plan for Washington, DC
Monday, 12:30 – 1:30 pm

The U.S. Commission of Fine Arts has recently published Designing the Nation’s Capital: The 1901 Plan for Washington, DC, a collection of essays related to what is commonly known as the “McMillan Plan.” The seven essays by leading scholars provide valuable historical context and examine the lesser-known features of this wide-ranging plan that has guided Washington’s development for the past century. Co-editor Pamela Scott, a local architectural historian, will join several of the contributing authors for a discussion of their discoveries and insights concerning this important part of Washington’s planning history.

Free. Registration not required.

National Building Museum · 401 F Street NW · Washington, DC · 20001 · 202 272-2448 · www.nbm.org

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To read or download Reconnecting the National Mall to the Capital City in the 21st Century, go to http://www.savethemall.org/ and click on the grey box “Read Coalition President….” We also provide there a link to the podcast of the entire symposium on the National Building Museum’s website. To refresh your memory about the April 11 symposium, you can read the update we sent out April 16 with press coverage and commentary of the event, which was sponsored by the National Capital Planning Commission, the Commission of Fine Arts, and the Building Museum.

Your comments and ideas on this talk are welcome. We are continuing to develop these and other topics that will be presented in various public venues in coming months and next year. More on that later.

 

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